UNCLASSIFIED
21 AUG 1989

UNIT HISTORY
35th Security Police Squadron
1 April 1969 - 30 June 1969

ALBERT C. ROCK III, 1ST LT., USAF
Unit Historian
15 July 1969

Approved by DONALD E. REEVES, LT COL, USAF
Chief Security Police
DECLASSIFIED
DOD DIR 5200.8
UNCLASSIFIED
App 19 copy 1 of 4 copies

CONTENTS I Mission and Personnel --- page 1
    1. Mission --- page 1
    2. Major Personnel Changes --- page 1
    3. Roster of Key Personnel --- page 1
    4. Decorations --- page 2
    5. Deaths --- page 2
    6. Wounded --- page 2
II Resources
    1, 2, 3. Equipment and Facilities --- page 3
III Training and Supply
    1. Training Accomplishments --- page 3
IV Operations
    1. Attacks --- page 4
    2. Breakdown of Attacks --- page 4
V. Problem Areas --- page 5

I Mission and Personnel

    1. Mission: The mission of the 35th Security Police Squadron is to defend the personnel and resources of Phan Rang Air Base against any nature of enemy attack, to gather and coordinate intelligence with all available friendly forces, and to insure that law and order prevail. 2. Major Personnel Changes a. Capt. Claine J. Petersen, an intelligence-trained security policeman, on 10 April 1969 replaced 1st/LT. A. C. Rock III as Coordinating Officer, Installation Coordination Center (ICC). Lt. Rock assumed the duties of Squadron Section Commander. b. 1ST/LT Morton J. Bond assumed duties as Law Enforcement Officer on 12 April 1969, replacing Capt John R. Mc Elhaney who departed PCs to USAFE. c. 1ST/LT Ronald E. White, Asst. Security Operations Officer, departed PCS on 22 June 1969 for Stewart AFB, N.Y. d. CMSgt James K. Driggers on 12 June 1969 assumed the duties of SPS Superintendent, replacing SSgt Raymond Turner who retired upon completion of his tour in March 1969. e. TSgt Gerald C. Taylor assumed duties as Law Enforcement NCOIC on 9 June 1969, replacing TSgt Glenn R. Osburn who departed PCS for USAFE. f. SSgt John H. Wienand III assumed duties as NCOIC of Classified Management on 10 June 1969, replacing SSgt Arthur J. Wardle who departed PCS for USAFE. g. SSgt Garland E Sanders on 1 May 69 assumed duties as OJT Supervisor, replacing SSgt Howard A. Hicks who departed PCS for USAFE. h. TSgt George A. Daft assumed duties as Training NCOIC on 16 June 69, replacing SSgt James V. Smith who departed PCS for Blytheville AFB, Arkansas. 3. Roster of Key Personnel - a/o 30 June 69

      a. Chief Security Police
      Lt/Col Donald E. Reeves
      b. Operations
      Major William H. Powell
      c. Security Operations
      Capt David L. Bronn
      d. ICC
      Capt Claine Petersen
      e. Training/Supply
      Capt John P. Todd
      f. Law Enforcement
      1st /LT. Morton J. Bond
      g. Section Commander
      1st /LT. Albert C. Rock III
      h. Superintendent
      CMSgt James K. Driggers
      i. Sec Ops NCOIC
      MSgt William B. Frazier
      j. First Sergeant
      TSgt Joseph E. Moore

    4. Decorations

    Major W. H. Powell
    Silver Star
    SSgt L. G. Kirk
    Silver Star
    Sgt T. J. Caputo
    Silver Star
    TSgt W. Hart
    Bronze Star
    SSgt R. C. Logan
    Bronze Star
    SSgt L. R. Kelley
    Bronze Star
    Sgt R. D. Claunch
    Bronze Star
    Sgt D. M. Hatton
    Bronze Star
    Lt. Co. D. E. Reeves
    Air Force Commendation Medal
    SSgt C.D. Presnail
    Air Force Commendation Medal
    SSgt H. J. Kauppa
    Air Force Commendation Medal
    Sgt T. M. Hunstiger
    Air Force Commendation Medal
    AlC J. C. Loftis
    Air Force Commendation Medal
     
    Purple Heart (Posthumously)
    AlC J. R. Dean
    Air Force Commendation Medal
    AlC A. L. Lampe
    Air Force Commendation Medal
    Sgt C. Johnson
    Purple Heart
    Sgt H. Harris
    Purple Heart
    A1C J. L. Alexander
    Purple Heart
    A1C R. E. Timmons
    Purple Heart

    5. Deaths

      a. A1C Lawrence H. Grillo, B Flight Security, was killed when lightning struck his tower at Juliett-10, on 28 May 69.
      b. AlC Joel C . Loftis, Sentry Dog Handler, was killed at 1620 hours of 7 June 69 during a daylight attack in which a Chicom 107 mm rocket impacted in the K-9 barracks area.

    6. Wounded
      a. Sgt Chancellor Johnson was seriously wounded during the 7 June attack. He was air-evacuated to Cam Ranh Bay AB.
      b. AlC Johnson L. Alexander received leg wounds during the 6 June attack.
      c. Sgt Harold Harris received minor wounds during the 7 June attack.
      d. A1C Robert E. Timmons was seriously wounded by 82 mm mortar fragments during an attack against the base at 2359 hours, 18 June 1969. He was air-evacuated to Cam Ranh Bay AB.
II Resources: Equipment / Facilities
    1. The Sentry Dog Section remodeled its own Armory to accommodate 60 PT 200 radios, thereby relieving the SPS Armory of some of its workload.
    a. The Kennel Support building was repaintedide and out; the obstacle course was repaired and the sentry dog graveyard was refurbished.
    2. Personnel from the 821st CSPS Installed a sizeable number of anti-personnel pressure mines between fences on the perimeter.
    a. SPS personnel constructed 137 new earthen-type fighting bunkers inside the perimeter.
    b. A team from Pacific GEEIA Region in Hawaii surveyed the base prior to installation of tactical security support equipment (TSSE) during 1970.
    c. On 26 June 69 a local BEEIA Team began to install telephone land-lines from CSC to all Towers and major bunkers.
    3. Munitions stocks were increased to authorizations. Relocation of munitions storage was completed. Three magazines were added and the new complex surrounded with some 370 tons of sand.
    a. Armory-interior was repainted; weapons/equipment racks were repainted; maintenance area was modified by constructing additional cleaning tables; all weapons were renumbered; one additional VRC 47 unit was acquired.
III Training and Supply
    1. Training Accomplishments
    a. During the quarter, 350 Security Policemen completed incountry training; training completed for 218 initial and 308 recurring augmentees.
    b. Training evaluated a Red Option II exercise on 23 June 69.
    c. OJT Status
    In Tng
    Excess
    Tng
    Upgrade
    Code Y
    Apr
    104
    32
    22
    16
    May
    30
    13
    53
    18
    Jun
    98
    9
    15
    3

    b. CBPO's SMSgt Mayfield inspected the OJT section on 8 'April. He rated the Maintenance of the Consolidated Training Records from 623, unsatisfactory. In a follow-up inspection on 9 May those records and the OJT section were adjudged satisfactory.
    c. On 8 May Capt Cormine and SSgt Cerre from 7th AF conducted an OJT Staff Assistance visit. They reported the SPS/OJT program to be commendable.
    d. SSgt Jimmy D. Brookshire during June assumed the squadron supply duties.
IV Operations

    1. The Air Base was attacked 11 times during the quarter. The enemy did not repeat his 26 January 69 attempt to penetrate the perimeter but he broadened his use of long-range rockets to include attacks during broad daylight. All attacks were of the standoff weapons variety using the Chicom 107mm rocket and/or 82mm mortar. The total rounds impacting on the installation was 151, 22 rockets and 129 mortars. Damage to resources was relatively light, but there was a greater than normal casualty rate: 2 USAF KIA, 12 USAF WIA, 1 US civilian WIA, and 8 RVN civilians WIA. The 2 Air Force members were killed when the enemy launched from the North an unprecedented afternoon attack at 1620 hours, 7 June. The attack was characterized by disbelief and general confusion on the part of most base personnel. Security Policemen, in spite of the siren, had difficulty convincing crowds of people that the base was under attack and that there was wisdom in seeking shelter. The siren had been delayed, also caused by confusion over the nature of the (3) explosions. Since that time the Chief Security Police has made it policy to sound the siren upon any probable launch flash or unknown explosion, acting on the principle that it is more desirable to initiate a false alarm than to take the chance of suffering further casualties. Security Policemen, further, are instructed to order all personnel to shelter when the base comes under attack, and to report any who do not comply.

    2. Breakdown of attacks during the I

    April 1969 - 30 June 1969 quarter.

    Date
    Type
    Number
    Impact
    13 0128Hrs (Apr)
    107/82 mm
    5/8
    Lox, 101st N. runway/W22
    13 0150Hrs
       
    Runway/W22
    13 0256Hrs
         
    21 2354Hrs (Apr)
    107 mm
    05
    Runway
    25 2320Hrs (Apr)
    82 mm
    10
    500 M from fence-line
    12 0047Hrs (May)
    82 mm
    30
    C-123 area
    16 0021Hrs (May)
    82 mm
    22
    Delta area
    22 0003Hrs (May)
    82 mm
    18
    Delta area
    06 0303Hrs (Jun)
    107/82 mm
    5/10
    Revetment/Aerial Port
         
    A+E RMK Equipment
    07 1620Hrs (Jun)
    107 mm
    03
    K-9 BKs/ CSPS Clothing
    11 0001Hrs (Jun)
    82 mm
    17
    Delta area
    18 2359Hrs (Jun)
    82 mm
    14
    Beach Gate
    20 1924Hrs (Jun)
    107 mm
    04
    Runway/Seahorse area
    Problem Areas 1. Vehicle replacement parts were scarce during the quarter. A new motor pool sub-section, "Vehicle Administration and Supply" was created to coordinate and equipment acquisition among the SPS Base Motor Pool, and Base Supply. There has been some success in procurement under this program, and improvement should continue curing the next quarter.
    2. Manning, last quarter's most severe problem area, improved notably during this quarter. Against the authorized assigned strength of 564 enlisted men and 8 officers, 1 April 1969 reflected 460/8, far below full strength. As of 30 June, however, there were 550 enlisted men and 7 officers present for duty.
    3. Manning continued to affect the Sentry Dog (K-9) Section, however as normal rotation without timely replacements depleted its ranks. Five SPS volunteers crosstrained into the field to bolster the section; two of these wen were sent to Showa AFB, Japan, for training. Sgt D.A. Travis graduated as Honor Student and AlC G. E. Sandvik as runner-up Honor Student.
    a. The K-9 section, headquartered apart from the squadron proper near the North perimeter, continued to suffer from electrical and water supply problems. Electricity is supplied by a generator which had to be replaced 5 times during the quarter due to malfunctions. Aside from the obvious problems, a stock of medical supplies requiring refrigeration had to be transported to the dispensary during extended periods of power outage. All water now is transported to the section in water tanks the base water supply having been discontinued.

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